Is Technology REALLY our Friend?

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Have you ever had that moment of panic or anxiety when using your smart phone?  You know the feeling - all of a sudden, something on the screen doesn’t look right and you don’t know what’s going on?  I know I have.

If you’re in your 50’s or 60’s (or older) you’re considered a member of the baby boomer generation.  Our kids and grandkids roll their eyes at how tech-savvy some of us aren’t, and make good-humored but snarky comments when we ask questions about iPhones and iPads and computers.  

Trying to keep up with all this technology is hard work!  But believe it or not, research and development with hearing aids and hearing technology is aggressive, and the benefits have never been easier to take advantage of.

Believe it or not, research and development with hearing aids and hearing technology is aggressive, and the benefits have never been easier to take advantage of.
— Dr. Kurt Wright

It may not be of vital importance to have the latest version of the iPhone, but as an audiologist in the Charlotte area, I strongly recommend you pursue the very latest technology when it comes to hearing aids.

If you already have hearing aids, here are some things to consider:

·     How old are your hearing aids?  

·     How long has it been since you had your hearing aids programmed?  

·     Have they ever been programmed?

·     Have you had a significant change in hearing?  

·     Are your hearing aids working as well as they did when they were new?

·     Do your hearing aids fit as comfortably as they used to?

·     Has your lifestyle changed since your last purchase?

·     Do the hearing aids make odd sounds, distort, or just don’t give you the sound clarity that they used to?

Fun Fact:  the average lifespan of hearing aids is about 4.5 to 5 years. 

If your hearing aids are 7 years old and you feel they still work “good enough” – the facts are, the processing power is not as strong as it once was, which can create sound distortion you may not even be noticing.  

Or maybe you are…

When hearing aids don’t work as well as they’re designed to, our brain has to strain and work harder to hear, which can leave us feeling fatigued and tired.   

Does that sound familiar?

If you’re considering hearing aids, but have concerns, here are some things to know:

·     Connective technology that syncs with our phones allows us to talk on our phone or stream our favorite music in high definition, right through our hearing aids – all at the touch of a button

·     Devices that pair hearing aids with our televisions are common-place now, so no more asking the family to “turn up the volume”

·     Ear-to-ear technology allows your hearing aids to make environmental decisions by communicating with each other, making listening in difficult environments much more comfortable

·     Our patients have noticed significant improvements in listening performance – whether it’s having more clarity when talking to friends or family with softer voices, or the ability to discern voices in a restaurant or noisy environment.

 Today’s hearing technology is smarter, better, faster and easier than ever before – and most people will never even know you’re wearing them.

If you’re interviewing audiologists, make certain your audiologist can:

·     Speak intelligently about the very latest hearing technology

·     Explain the benefits of hearing technology to you and your lifestyle 

·     Demonstrate how hearing better can help you focus on the things that matter

Things to think about:

  • Are you already benefiting from the latest hearing technology?

  • What would life look like if you could hear better?

  • What’s holding you back from finding out?


About the Author:

 Dr. Kurt D. Wright

Dr. Kurt D. Wright

Dr. Kurt D. Wright has been helping people hear better for over 20 years. He is the founding audiologist at Manna Audiology Hearing Center, a hearing clinic which services Charlotte, North Carolina and metro area. He earned his Doctor of Audiology Degree (Au.D.) from Salus University in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania and a Master’s degree in Augiology from Kent State University. He has a bachelor’s degree from Olivet Nazarene University in Kankakee, Illinois.  Dr. Wright is a member of the American Academy of Audiology (AAA) as well as a Fellow of the Academy of Doctors of Audiology (ADA). The Audiological Resource Association (ARA) honored him as the recipient of the 2015 Outstanding Audiologist Award. 

Dr. Wright has a passion for helping each Charlotte area patient achieve the best hearing possible.